Joe Colborne

by Jason Banks on December 13, 2011

 

 

Joe Colborne, C

Shoots: L

Height: 6-5

Weight: 213

Born: 1990-01-30

Hometown: Calgary, Alberta

Drafted: 2008 by Boston 16th overall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Observations:

 

October 19 2014 – Colborne will be tried on the first line tonight with Sean Monahan and Jiri Hudler. The big guy has five assists and is a plus-3 (second on the team) through six contests. Brad Wilson

 

July 2014 – The Flames signed Colborne to a two year one way deal at 1.275m AAV. He comes back to join an exciting time in Calgary as they are brimming with young talent. Brad Wilson

 

 

March 2014 – Previous to this year Colborne’s career highs were 10 games and five points in a season. This time around his 24 points (including 9 goals) in 71 games (as of printing) has shown a little of why he was drafted 16th overall. The ex-Maples Leafs/Bruins prospect has played well in his first full NHL season and has settled in on the third line beside Sean Monahan. He has also seen time moving up the lineup and you can look for this young powerhouse to continue to get better as his confidence grows. Although the Flames will miss the post-season, Colborne is finishing strong. He currently has 9 points (five goals) in 14 games so far in the month of March. We could finally be seeing the real Joe Colborne. Brad Wilson

 

September 2013 – After a lack luster training camp in which he compiled a trio assists in six games, the Leafs cleaned up a waiver issue by dealing Joe to the Calgary Flames, who are desperate to find a key center man to make an impact. He will likely see minutes in the top three lines. Jason Banks

 

August 2013 – Currently the Leafs have declined to sign depth forwards for the team, and seems like Nonis is creating opportunity for growth from within. Colborne is currently looking like he will be the main beneficiary of the forwards and barring a poor training camp, he should break camp playing in ACC rather than Ricoh Coliseum. He has not excited me with his development the past couple seasons but he has shown minor growth but not the type that makes him live up to projections. He will slot in likely on the left side and move to center on an ‘as needed’ basis. Jason Banks

 

 

December 2012 – Colborne’s poor play that ended last season has continued. He still shows no signs of becoming a power forward that many have been hoping for and expecting as he lacks the physical aggressiveness. He is making poor shot selections, trying all too often to drive pucks through defenders on bad angles, and plays a rather weak perimeter game. He works hard, but unfortunately he does not put himself in positions for himself to succeed or take advantage of. Jason Banks

 

May 2012 – Colborne has had a poor final half of the season with the Marlies, compiling only four points in the final 24 games and sporting a negative 11 in those games. But he has bounced back in the playoffs with five points in eight games. Colborne missed the end of the end of the second round after suffering an extremely deep laceration to a finger. This injury is one that will continue to be sensitive for the rest of the playoffs making any production Colborne manages quite a feat. Carter Ashton’s arrival in Toronto creates a bigger battle for roster spots and call ups as Brian Burke appears to be sending a message that there will be competition for roster spots this fall. Colborne must compete and take advantage of his size more to set himself apart, instead of playing an outside game. Jason Banks

 

December, 2011 – Took advantage of minimal ice time and little PP time to post points in five of his first six NHL games…Was leading the AHL in scoring before injuring his ankle…Is showing, statistically, that he is very close to landing an NHL job, but will need a couple of seasons on the third line before taking that next step…Injuries have been of the small, nagging variety but they are enough to be a concern. Against bigger, stronger players he could become one of the players who play 70 games per season…With a sniper on his line, he could easily be a point-per-game player. Without one, it’s a long shot…

 

Outlook: B+

Here to stay in the NHL, Colborne projects as a solid third liner with top 6 potential. Upside is likely second line but on a weak Flames team he can see top line minutes from time to time.

 

Footage:

Colborne Goes Shelf:

 

 

 

Colborne’s first NHL goal: