Photo courtesy of NHL.com

Fantasy Summary

A solid two-way winger who has a good shot. He plays a physical game and brings value in multi-cat leagues.


Observations

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May 2022 – Luke Tuch had a very difficult sophomore season at Boston University. His weaknesses were somewhat concealed as a rookie due to his surprisingly good production in a small 18-game sample. However, it was apparent this year that he was consistently a step behind the game. He lacks planning in the offensive zone and rarely finds the best play to execute. He has blinders on with the puck, looking more to dump the puck in upon entering the zone than to pass to an open teammate, and even when he does spot passing options, he more often than not passes into the sticks or skates of opposing defenders. Tuch lacks an understanding of passing lanes in the defensive zone, and his contributions are inconsistent at best. This is not to say he is without his strengths, however. Tuch is a true grinder. He plays a hard-nosed game and is already a rather competent net-front presence at the NCAA level; he’s strong enough to disrupt defenders and park himself in the goalie’s field of view and possesses the hand-eye coordination to be a tipping threat. His shot is also an asset. While it may lack some accuracy, his wrist shot can be shockingly violent. If it continues to be refined, his shot projects as slightly above NHL-average, but in order to project as an entire package to the NHL, Tuch has a lot of work to do in the mental part of the game. While he remains young, Tuch already seems to be a coinflip to make the NHL in any capacity, which is not what any team wants of a player they picked in the second round less than two years ago. He could have value in fantasy leagues that value hits and be a decent addition in larger leagues. Sebastian High

July 2021 – Tuch had a solid freshman season for Boston College, managing 11 points in 16 games in a pandemic altered season. Tuch’s skating improved during this season, which allowed him to assert himself on the forecheck, use his size and strength, and get his team possession of the puck. He will hope to build on this season with a full sophomore season in a more typical hockey year. Pablo Ruiz